The GWT Blog

Blog Category: Competition

“Think-load” versus Workload

January 27, 2011

By Peter Gow, Director of College Counseling and Special Programs, Beaver Country Day School
Between Tiger Moms and racing to nowhere, we’re a nation obsessed with stress. Do our students experience too much of it, or too little? Does an endless cycle of high-stakes standardized testing turn kids into jibbering shells of their authentic selves, or do parents and schools need to push students even harder to extract from them the most perfect essence (and the last drop) of their true potential?

In Search of Corporate Heroes...

July 29, 2010

By Howard Gardner
I don't think we lack any CEO heroes. But I suspect that the true heroes are largely unsung, and prefer to remain that way.

Lay It on the Table

May 26, 2010

By Bill Bussey, Provost, Ombudsman, English Teacher at Noble and Greenough School
The end of the year for graduates is understandably pretty much all about them, but to be honest, sometimes we all can lose perspective down the final stretch.

Can We Trust Goldman Sachs?

April 26, 2010

By Howard Gardner
Goldman Sachs is widely acknowledged to be a leader in its field and has certainly been successful by most commonly applied criteria. But it has to decide what business or profession it is in. If it is just a business, whose goal is to make as much money as possible for partners and shareholders, then it needs to make that clear.

Success in Teaching

February 26, 2010

By Wendy Fischman
Today is the second day of the Expeditionary Learning (EL) National Conference 2010, in Kansas City (where the temperature outside seems to be "warming up" to a whopping 30 degrees!). The conference has been inspiring and powerful thus far, and even more so for us on the GoodWork Project because of its focus on "good work."

Surface Manifestations of Leadership

February 12, 2010

By Howard Gardner
With President's Day around the corner, it seems a good time to reflect on the nature of leadership. Below, we share Howard Gardner's responses to some questions recently posed by an Italian journalist.

The Ministers' Misconceptions

January 11, 2010

By Howard Gardner
Of all the findings from cognitive psychology that are relevant for education, one stands out. That is the repeated demonstration, across a number of disciplines, of the prevalence of misconceptions and the difficulty of getting rid of them and replacing them with more powerful and more veridical conceptions.

Nobel Prize for Mentorship?

October 16, 2009

By Lynn Barendsen
The recent announcement of the Nobel Laureates in Medicine point to another achievement that deserves recognition: outstanding mentorship. Elizabeth Blackburn and Carol Greider were members of a scientific "lineage" with Joseph Gall at its head. Blackburn studied under Gall; Greider studied under Blackburn. Two very successful women in a field that has been dominated by men, in a field in which mentoring does not typically come first.

The Road to Hell?

September 26, 2009

By Howard Gardner
If the proverbial inter-planetary visitor observed educational policymakers around the world, she would soon infer their single preoccupation: “How to raise scores on international comparisons like the TIMMS or the PISA tests.” This mentality also dominates the United States. A focus on standardized tests, how to raise scores, and what consequences follow ...
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