The GWT Blog

Blog Category: Social Responsibility

Educating for Today and Tomorrow

November 22, 2010

By Lynn Barendsen
Last week, along with several colleagues from Project Zero, I participated in a conference in Washington DC. Our hosts were CASIE (Center for the Advancement and Study of International Education) and WIS (the Washington International School).

News from India

November 09, 2010

By Lynn Barendsen
Our colleague and inspired educator Kiran Sethi has sent us news about the Design for Change (DFC) initiative. The DFC Contest is an international contest encouraging children to make positive change happen in their communities.

Announcing Shelter - a new book by one of our GW Alumni

September 16, 2010

By Scott Seider
Every winter night the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter brings together society's most privileged and marginalized groups under one roof: Harvard students and the homeless. What makes the Harvard Square Shelter unique is that it is operated entirely by Harvard College students. It is the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States.

Early Warning Signs of Ethical Disaster

August 09, 2010

By Shelly London, The Family Dinner Project
It seems that every major disaster is followed by almost pro forma revelations of danger signs that should have alerted us to the danger but were ignored. We heard those revelations in the aftermath of 9/11 and we're hearing them now as the BP oil spill takes its place as the worst environmental disaster in American history.

Five Star Green Hotels

August 05, 2010

By Howard Gardner
This spring I was fortunate enough to undertake a round-the-world trip, visiting St Petersburg, Helsinki, Beijing, and Singapore. In each city I was the guest of a local host who booked me a room—and sometimes a suite—at a well regarded hotel. I was treated well and enjoyed myself. But at the same time, I was struck and disturbed by the huge waste in each place.

In Search of Corporate Heroes...

July 29, 2010

By Howard Gardner
I don't think we lack any CEO heroes. But I suspect that the true heroes are largely unsung, and prefer to remain that way.

Children and Good Work

June 28, 2010

By Susan Larson
Very young children appear to embrace Good Work with greater enthusiasm than their older classmates. For nine years in elementary and middle school, we teach our students about numbers and dates and places. Then on weekends some of the students go to church, temple or synagogue to address their spiritual selves. The twain rarely meet. This project sought to join the two worlds, to help children get in touch with their better angels, to open their lives to the possibility of wonder.

Google and Goldman

June 27, 2010

By Howard Gardner
At least until the spring of 2010, two lines of work have been particularly seductive for 'the best and the brightest'—the graduates of our leading colleges and universities. One professional option has entailed work at the cutting edge of the technology sector—for Facebook, Apple or Google. Complementing Silicon Valley, the other option has been to work on "The Street"—in investment banking, hedge funds, or some other branch of the financial industry.

On Being a True Activist

May 11, 2010

By Bill Bussey, Provost, Ombudsman, English Teacher at Noble and Greenough School
A while ago I put forth the proposition that there are no innocent bystanders, that those who sat idle while classmates were being humiliated or taken advantage of against their wishes were a major part of the problem. Our students will forever hesitate to stand up for what is morally right if they perceive a social cost, and they may never do it if the adults in their world do not stand up with them and for them in their formative years.

Inspiring for Change: GoodWork for Mexico's Children

April 28, 2010

By Yael Karakowsky, Preschool Teacher, Mexico City
My name is Yael Karakowsky; I am from Mexico and have been a preschool teacher for the last 3 years. I often ask myself how many "dreamers" are out there … doing everything they can, walking that extra mile, never missing a chance and always seeking to do a little bit more. I consider myself a fighter, a dreamer and sometimes … a person that expects more than what is actually possible...

Inspirando al cambio: GoodWork para los niños de México

April 27, 2010

By Yael Karakowsky, Preschool Teacher, Mexico City
Mi nombre es Yael Karakowsky. Soy mexicana y he trabajado como maestra de preescolar durante los últimos tres años. Constantemente me pregunto ¿cuántos soñadores hay allá afuera?... personas que salen de la norma, que no descansan hasta dar ese paso extra, intentando no perder oportunidades y siempre buscando hacer un poco más. Me considero una de estas personas; una luchadora, una soñadora y en ocasiones… una persona que podría esperar más de lo que es realmente posible.

Can We Trust Goldman Sachs?

April 26, 2010

By Howard Gardner
Goldman Sachs is widely acknowledged to be a leader in its field and has certainly been successful by most commonly applied criteria. But it has to decide what business or profession it is in. If it is just a business, whose goal is to make as much money as possible for partners and shareholders, then it needs to make that clear.

GoodWork in Nursing

March 17, 2010

By Joan Miller
My name is Joan Miller. I have been a nurse for over 35 years. I currently teach in a baccalaureate nursing program at Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA. I entered the profession with a desire to provide excellent care for my patients. I wanted to be known as a caring nurse, one willing to work hard, listen well, and show that my patients were always my top priority. I've worked hard to foster professional growth and excellence among my students. However, much to my dismay, many new graduates become disillusioned when they enter the work place.

Digital Media and American Youth

February 22, 2010

By Katie Davis
Have the digital media changed American youth? That's the question that a group of researchers, including members of Howard Gardner's research team at Project Zero, met to discuss last December in Princeton, New Jersey.

Surface Manifestations of Leadership

February 12, 2010

By Howard Gardner
With President's Day around the corner, it seems a good time to reflect on the nature of leadership. Below, we share Howard Gardner's responses to some questions recently posed by an Italian journalist.

Howard Gardner in Mexico City

February 01, 2010

By Mayus Chavez, Jules Verne School
Last October, Mexico City had the pleasure of receiving Dr. Howard Gardner. Banamex, one of the most important Mexican Financial Groups, invited him to their " 2009-3rd Encuentro de Educación Financiera "Respuestas de Pe$o" Ser, conocer y hacer para vivir juntos". Dr. Garder's lecture "Five Minds of the Future" gave participants new alternatives to develop strategies within ourselves, and everyone who is devoted to education in a formal or informal way.

The Ministers' Misconceptions

January 11, 2010

By Howard Gardner
Of all the findings from cognitive psychology that are relevant for education, one stands out. That is the repeated demonstration, across a number of disciplines, of the prevalence of misconceptions and the difficulty of getting rid of them and replacing them with more powerful and more veridical conceptions.

Press Release: On Teens' Online Activities

December 04, 2009

By Carrie James
Global Kids, Harvard's GoodPlay Project and Common Sense Media today released Meeting of Minds, a report that highlights the ways in which parents, teachers, and teens relate to the emerging ethical dimensions of life online. The report is the result of a series of cross-generational online dialogues held this past spring about digital ethics, and reveals the critical importance of active adult engagement with teens to help develop healthy attitudes about online behaviors that often have long-lasting and far-reaching effects.

A Choice with Real Value

October 27, 2009

By Kathleen Kury Farrell
Choice and opportunity are emblems of freedom. But researchers tell us that the myriad options available to us are no longer liberating but quite oppressive. Studies indicate that the number of decisions we make every day – in the cereal aisle, at the espresso stand, on our cable TVs - are literally exhausting us. Perhaps more significant is the implication that the constant stream of relatively minor decisions we make may lead us to make poorer choices across all areas of our lives.

The Obama Gamble

October 14, 2009

By Howard Gardner
I begin with a confession. Away from my home in Cambridge, traveling in London, I must admit, with embarrassment, that when I first saw the headline in a tabloid "Obama wind Nobel Peace Prize" I thought it was a joke. After all, the satirical publication, the ONION has featured headlines that were less surprising. A bit later, I realized that the joke was on me.

The Road to Hell?

September 26, 2009

By Howard Gardner
If the proverbial inter-planetary visitor observed educational policymakers around the world, she would soon infer their single preoccupation: “How to raise scores on international comparisons like the TIMMS or the PISA tests.” This mentality also dominates the United States. A focus on standardized tests, how to raise scores, and what consequences follow ...

Looking for Good Work

September 25, 2009

By Amy Quon
A year ago, I was content in California—finishing up graduate school coursework and working in educational program assessment. Based on what I hear from everyone who’s ever spent a winter in New England, I probably should have appreciated the sunshine and cool breezes back home (read: the opposite of gray skies and icy wind) a bit more.
dot_clear