The GWT Blog

Blog Category: GoodWork Project

The New and Improved GW Toolkit

October 14, 2010

By Lynn Barendsen
This past summer, Wendy and I reworked the GoodWork Toolkit. We’re very excited by the result – and hope you will be too.

My Summer Job

August 16, 2010

By Lucy Curran, Undergraduate at Harvard University and Summer Intern on the GoodWork Project.
I have come to understand that when I find work that truly engages me, I cannot wait to get out of bed in the morning. Instead of waking up with a sense of dread and hitting the snooze button, I am excited to start the day. This does not have to be true every day; but it ought to be the trend.

Thoughts about the Summer Institute

August 03, 2010

By Wendy Fischman
We have just wrapped up our Project Zero annual Summer Institute—when hundreds of educators from all over the world come to Cambridge to learn about Project Zero research and practice methods. It is always an energizing experience for us researchers—it is a reminder for many of us that we are fortunate to do work that is engaging and stimulating, and attendees always make us feel as though it is important and helpful to their own work‚ which is rewarding for us to hear.

GoodWork in Nursing

March 17, 2010

By Joan Miller
My name is Joan Miller. I have been a nurse for over 35 years. I currently teach in a baccalaureate nursing program at Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA. I entered the profession with a desire to provide excellent care for my patients. I wanted to be known as a caring nurse, one willing to work hard, listen well, and show that my patients were always my top priority. I've worked hard to foster professional growth and excellence among my students. However, much to my dismay, many new graduates become disillusioned when they enter the work place.

"Good work. It's what we're all about."

February 25, 2010

By Lynn Barendsen

Expeditionary Learning 2010 National Conference

Wendy and I are attending the Expeditionary Learning Schools National Conference in Kansas City. An amazing group of educators, and an inspiring series of discussions. This year's focus is on good work and we're honored to be a part of it. For those of you who aren't yet familiar with Expeditionary Learning, let me tell you a little bit about it, because it's growing, it's having impact, and that impact is of exceptional quality.

Digital Media and American Youth

February 22, 2010

By Katie Davis
Have the digital media changed American youth? That's the question that a group of researchers, including members of Howard Gardner's research team at Project Zero, met to discuss last December in Princeton, New Jersey.

Howard Gardner in Mexico City

February 01, 2010

By Mayus Chavez, Jules Verne School
Last October, Mexico City had the pleasure of receiving Dr. Howard Gardner. Banamex, one of the most important Mexican Financial Groups, invited him to their " 2009-3rd Encuentro de Educación Financiera "Respuestas de Pe$o" Ser, conocer y hacer para vivir juntos". Dr. Garder's lecture "Five Minds of the Future" gave participants new alternatives to develop strategies within ourselves, and everyone who is devoted to education in a formal or informal way.

Press Release: On Teens' Online Activities

December 04, 2009

By Carrie James
Global Kids, Harvard's GoodPlay Project and Common Sense Media today released Meeting of Minds, a report that highlights the ways in which parents, teachers, and teens relate to the emerging ethical dimensions of life online. The report is the result of a series of cross-generational online dialogues held this past spring about digital ethics, and reveals the critical importance of active adult engagement with teens to help develop healthy attitudes about online behaviors that often have long-lasting and far-reaching effects.

A Choice with Real Value

October 27, 2009

By Kathleen Kury Farrell
Choice and opportunity are emblems of freedom. But researchers tell us that the myriad options available to us are no longer liberating but quite oppressive. Studies indicate that the number of decisions we make every day – in the cereal aisle, at the espresso stand, on our cable TVs - are literally exhausting us. Perhaps more significant is the implication that the constant stream of relatively minor decisions we make may lead us to make poorer choices across all areas of our lives.

Nobel Prize for Mentorship?

October 16, 2009

By Lynn Barendsen
The recent announcement of the Nobel Laureates in Medicine point to another achievement that deserves recognition: outstanding mentorship. Elizabeth Blackburn and Carol Greider were members of a scientific "lineage" with Joseph Gall at its head. Blackburn studied under Gall; Greider studied under Blackburn. Two very successful women in a field that has been dominated by men, in a field in which mentoring does not typically come first.

The Road to Hell?

September 26, 2009

By Howard Gardner
If the proverbial inter-planetary visitor observed educational policymakers around the world, she would soon infer their single preoccupation: “How to raise scores on international comparisons like the TIMMS or the PISA tests.” This mentality also dominates the United States. A focus on standardized tests, how to raise scores, and what consequences follow ...

Looking for Good Work

September 25, 2009

By Amy Quon
A year ago, I was content in California—finishing up graduate school coursework and working in educational program assessment. Based on what I hear from everyone who’s ever spent a winter in New England, I probably should have appreciated the sunshine and cool breezes back home (read: the opposite of gray skies and icy wind) a bit more.

Welcome!

September 15, 2009

By Lynn Barendsen
Welcome to the Toolkit website! This project has been a long time coming, and we are excited to watch what happens as this community comes together. In the past few months, we have been gathering together material for this site, and it's been a pleasure revisiting letters, syllabi, student work, and other materials gathered over the past few years.

What do you do in the summer?

July 20, 2009

By Wendy Fischman
Upon hearing that we work at a graduate school of education, people often ask us "What do you do in the summer?" "Do you get the summer off?" Our answer back is short: "NO!" In fact, in many ways, our summer is busier here at work because it is the time that educators have time to breathe, reflect on their year, and think about the academic year that lies ahead.
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